Stop Recurring Nightmares With Dream Control



If you’d like to learn how to control dreams in order to stop recurring nightmares, try to take a look at your inner self first and understand why they occur (you might’ve had an unpleasant emotional experience, or perhaps you went through a stressful exam etc.).

In ideal world, when we recognize an inner problem and work on it by conventional means (inner mind programming, therapy etc.), the long lasting recurring bad dream stops. This is obviously not always easy to accomplish. In cases where conventional therapy and self-development don’t seem to bring the desired effect, you might want to get help in your dream world.

Recurring Nightmares - Help From A Dream World

Art by Jeremiah Morelli

We all occasionally experience some kind of a bad dream, especially during tough times in our lives.

Unfortunately, there’s a great deal of people who have bad dreams all the time. A lot of them have repetitive nightmares, where they get chased by a tribe of wild aborigines, eaten by crocodiles or snakes, scared to death by zombies, or even shot or stabbed. These dreams may seem very real.

 

 

“I’ve also experienced a couple of obscure, even regrettable experiences. Once my body has dropped limb to the floor; unable to move. I could move my hands and my uper body, but my legs got melted into the floor. Firstly, I was scared. Then my fear turned into anger – WHY am I completely paralysed? Why can’t I just stand up and run?? Any movement seemed beyond human power. All of a sudden I spotted a tall, lean stranger, a David Carradine look-alike with totally wild looks. He was running towards me, swinging a katana in his hand. I sit there, instinctively protecting my head with my arms, my eyes filled with horror and tears. When he was just about to cut off my head, I woke up…”
 


How To Stop Recurring Nightmares With Dream Control

In order to learn how to control dreams to get hold of your recurring nightmares and to practice the technique I am going to suggest, you need to know how to become lucid. (get a fantastic guide to lucidity here). You have a higher chance of getting hold of your nightmares while you’re dreaming.

Why?

If you consciously acknowledge that you are in fact dreaming, it is much easier to deal with a stressful situation and realize, that nothing can harm you (no matter how stressful your experience is).

There is a great amount of various lucid dreaming techniques, depending on your experience level (including total beginner). The following are my top basic techniques that proved to be effective for me and other  lucid dreamers in fighting nightmares.

Top Four Advices to Stop Recurring Nightmares

Advice #1: The really easy way to learn how to control dreams to stop recurring nightmares is using the dream spinning technique (spinning on the spot like a child). No matter how silly it sounds, it is a very reliable technique to change your dream surroundings. In fact, if you focus on changing the setting into something else while spinning, most likely you’ll find out that the setting has changed into your desired surroundings after you stopped spinning.

Acoustic Brainwave Activation

Advice #2: The best way to “escape” from a nightmare is to fight your fear. Fear is the only real element of your bad dream; all the rest (like the danger itself, the demons etc.) are not. You can do it by challenging the threat (“come and get me”). Bad guys often transform into harmless creatures when courageously confronted in lucid dreams.

Advice #3:A really good way to fight your fears aquired over the years is using inner acoustic brainwave activation techniques. These techniques use THETA brainwave frequency and isochronic tones  to “re-program” the brain and change your level of conscious awareness - when using regularly, they can do miracles. One of the best on the market is Overcome Fear and Phobias (by Meditation~Power) - a 60-minute therapeutic isochronic tones recording designed to change the feelings of fear and anxiety into composure and courage.

Advice#4: Remind yourself constantly that you are in control.

Don’t allow yourself to become shattered by your emotions if you experience a stressful dream, or you are not successful in learning how to control dreams instantly. Stay calm, be persistent and keep practicing lucid dreaming. Soon you’ll be able to make a clean getaway from nightmare situations, or to create different “weapons” in your dreams to fight them.

If you wish to search for more information about the meaning of nightmares, most common nightmare themes, as well as proven techniques to stop recurring nightmares visit the official site of Lucid Dreaming Fast Track - currently the most comprehensive guide on lucid dreaming and conscious dream control on the market.

Final Thoughts About Stopping  Recurring Nightmares

Sometimes when I am in an anxious dream, I perform reality check and become lucid to take control of the situation. Then I decide what I want to do – to escape, to fix it, or turn it into a positive situation.

I found fighting my own fears in lucid dreams as the best way to stop recurring nightmares in a long run, and a truly empowering experience. It taught me in a very subtle and intuitive way that I can in fact conquer my fear and become stronger. I’m sure you can do it too!


About Denisa Veselska

Denisa Veselska is an experienced talent sourcer, certified yoga instructor and advocate of lucid dreaming and holistic health. She is a regular contributor to lucid dreaming related blogs. When she isn't at her computer, you'll find her practicing yoga, spending time with her family and friends or traveling the world.
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One Response to Stop Recurring Nightmares With Dream Control

  1. This article is a great help to me! Thank you!

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